How to Clear DNS Cache in Android Using Google Chrome and Net Internals DNS

clear cache android chrome net internals dns
clear cache android chrome net internals dns

In the high-speed world of digital advancement, one cannot understate the importance of personal online security and fluid browsing experiences. A significant step towards achieving these goals is the periodic clearance of the DNS host cache in your browser, a procedure often called a cache flush. This comprehensive guide will walk you through the steps needed to perform this task on your Android device using Google Chrome and net internals DNS.

Understanding the Importance of Clearing Cache

Clearing cache is more than just a routine task. It significantly enhances your online exploration experience on smartphones and serves as a protective measure against potential privacy invasions. Today’s focus will be on the chrome://net-internals/#dns Android method to eradicate obsolete host data and browsing history from Google Chrome. The value of this guide lies in its straightforward approach to flush the browsing host cache, thereby refreshing your Android device.

Insight Into Cache Clearing: The What, Why, and How

The term “chrome://net-internals/#dns android” may sound technical, but it’s simply a unique command for Google Chrome users on Android smartphones. This command activates cache clearing settings in Chrome, eliminating the need for additional cache cleaning apps on your Android device. The ability to clear cache android chrome net internals dns in a few simple steps is an indispensable skill for every Android user.

Guide to Purging DNS Cache in Chrome for Android

Here are the step-by-step instructions to remove all host cache data in Chrome for Android:

  1. First and foremost, open Chrome and ensure all open tabs are closed.
  2. In the address bar, type the code chrome://net-internals/#dns.
  3. Press the ENTER key on your on-screen keyboard and wait for a moment.
  4. On the page that appears, press the “Clear host cache” button.
  5. Allow a few seconds to approximately a minute for Chrome to completely clear the DNS cache.

You might not receive any confirmation message after performing these steps, but you should notice a speedier and more seamless browsing experience. This is because Chrome has effectively purged the DNS clutter, enabling the browser to fetch new data from the web server.

Techniques for Clearing DNS Cache on Android Devices (2023)

The ways to clear the DNS cache on Android devices are diverse and cater to different user preferences and tech savviness. These methods include traditional techniques, approaches for root users, and DNS server modifications.

Flushing DNS Cache in Google Chrome

Google Chrome isn’t just the default browser on Android devices; it also handles a myriad of system functionalities in the background. For frequent Chrome users, the DNS cache on Android can be cleared using a hidden Chrome URL.

Steps to Follow
  1. Open Chrome on your Android device and type the path chrome://net-internals/#dns. Then, press Enter.
  2. You’ll be redirected to the DNS lookup page. Here, tap the “Clear host cache” button to flush the DNS cache on your Android device.

Switching the DNS Server on Android

If clearing the DNS cache doesn’t solve the issue and the DNS server still can’t resolve the lookup, changing the DNS server may be the solution. Android 9 Pie introduced an official system-wide DNS setting.

Steps for Android 9 Pie and Above
  1. Open Settings on your Android device and navigate to “Network & internet” and then “Private DNS”.
  2. Choose the option “Private DNS provider hostname” and enter the DNS server of your choice.
Steps for Android 8.1 Oreo and Older
  1. Open Settings, navigate to “Network & internet”, then “Wi-Fi”, and select the Wi-Fi network you’re connected to.
  2. Change the “IP settings” to “Static”, then set DNS 1 and DNS 2 to the addresses of the new DNS servers.

Clearing DNS Cache for Rooted Android Devices

Clearing the DNS cache system-wide is technically only possible if your Android device is rooted. With a simple command, you can flush the DNS cache on your rooted Android device with relative ease.

In conclusion, with the above-mentioned steps, you can clear your cache effectively on your Android device using Google Chrome and net internals DNS. It not only ensures a smoother browsing experience but also serves as a safeguard to your online privacy.

QnA

What is the importance of clearing cache on Android devices?

Clearing cache not only eliminates browsing data but also significantly enhances your online exploration experience on smartphones. It also serves as a protective measure against potential privacy invasions.

How to purge DNS cache in Chrome for Android?

Open Chrome and close all tabs. In the address bar, type chrome://net-internals/#dns and hit ENTER. Press the ‘Clear host cache’ button on the displayed page. Allow Chrome a few seconds to clear the DNS cache.

How to clear DNS cache in Google Chrome on Android devices?

Open Chrome on your Android device and type the path chrome://net-internals/#dns. You’ll be redirected to the DNS lookup page. Tap the ‘Clear host cache’ button to flush the DNS cache on your device.

How to change the DNS server on Android?

For Android 9 and above, open Settings, navigate to ‘Network & internet’ and ‘Private DNS’. Choose ‘Private DNS provider hostname’ and enter the DNS server of your choice. For Android 8.1 and older, open Settings, navigate to ‘Network & internet’, ‘Wi-Fi’, and change the ‘IP settings’ to ‘Static’. Set DNS 1 and DNS 2 to the new DNS servers.

How to clear DNS cache for rooted Android devices?

Clearing the DNS cache system-wide is technically only possible if your Android device is rooted. With a simple command, you can flush the DNS cache on your rooted Android device with relative ease.

What are the benefits of clearing cache on Android devices?

Clearing cache ensures a smoother browsing experience and serves as a safeguard to your online privacy. It is an effective way to enhance the performance of your Android device.